Timothy Kalyegira
Timothy Kalyegira (45) is a researcher, columnist and regular suspect of the Ugandan state. He was arrested and detained twice, for ‘sedition’ and ‘criminal libel’, as a result of opinion pieces he wrote in his blog Uganda Online. His columns for the respectable Daily Monitor newspaper have also landed him in hot water. It has been said that African conflicts should be resolved through the African Union and regional African states. Foreign powers should stay away from conflict on the continent. But... Timothy Kalyegira (45) is a researcher, columnist and regular suspect of the Ugandan state. He was arrested and detained twice, for ‘sedition’ and...
Uncle Tom
How the Maasai make a business out of their traditions and how that is good for them. So a little girl called Mindy Budgor went to the Maasai in Kenya and made a fortune after she got herself a spear, killed a buffalo and became a Warrior Princess. She wrote a book about it and it’s all native and noble and full of love for red-dressed, barefoot Maasai and standing firm against lions, but mostly against Western influence that wants Maasai to live in houses and have TV’s. Oh yes and she also fixed... How the Maasai make a business out of their traditions and how that is good for them. So a little girl called Mindy Budgor went to the Maasai in Kenya...
Tobore Ovuorie
For many girls in Nigeria, child marriage is a choice families make out of the despair of poverty, argues Tobore Mit Ovuorie. Ovuorie (32) is a senior reporter with Premium Times , a Nigerian based investigative media house. A psychologist by training, Ovuorie won awards as Nigeria's investigative health reporter of the year, humanitarian reporter of the year and several others. There is a big protest movement against child marriage in Nigeria now, prompted by the failure of the Senate to clearly... For many girls in Nigeria, child marriage is a choice families make out of the despair of poverty, argues Tobore Mit Ovuorie. Ovuorie (32) is a senior...
Uncle Tom
Telling other people what to do is a puzzling business. Uncle Tom is quite shaken after reading up on a practice he didn’t know existed. Thanks to reports written by Unicef, I now know that in 29 countries, parents cut their daughters’ private parts. I now know about percentages, ways of cutting, ages of cutting, and the tools used to cut - much more than I would like to know, actually. Because Unicef asked over 200 questions of the cruel folks who do this thing. Sadly the answers that these... Telling other people what to do is a puzzling business. Uncle Tom is quite shaken after reading up on a practice he didn’t know existed. Thanks to...
Atunga Atuti O.J.
Customers should not boycott clothes that have been made by exploited workers, says the director of the East African School of Human Rights, Atunga Atuti O.J. . It’s a good idea, though, to question the origins of the goods you buy, and to engage the brands. When a clothing factory in Bangladesh collapsed, killing over a thousand workers, consumers worldwide felt guilty. “It’s partly our fault, because we want to buy clothes made cheaply in sweat shops” was a recurring outcry on social and in... Customers should not boycott clothes that have been made by exploited workers, says the director of the East African School of Human Rights, Atunga Atuti...
Uncle Tom
When Uncle Tom visited his relatives in Crossroads informal settlement in South Africa, no reporters were surprised to see us eating porridge and tomato gravy, taking the bus to town and having an alcoholic uncle (not me, mind you, it’s uncle Boetie) who walks around in a vest and scratches himself. That is, perhaps, because practically all families in Crossroads, South Africa, eat porridge, take the bus and have an alcoholic uncle. But when a BBC man called John Simpson saw white people living... When Uncle Tom visited his relatives in Crossroads informal settlement in South Africa, no reporters were surprised to see us eating porridge and tomato...
Joe Hanlon
Zimbabwe's land reform. Tens of thousands of violent Mugabe-supporters invaded prosperous white farms, wrecked them and reduced the country to ruins. Not true, says 'Zimbabwe takes back its land', a new book by Joe Hanlon, Jeanette Manjengwa and Teresa Smart. The ZAM Chronicle Q & A with Joe Hanlon You say the invaders weren't sent by Mugabe? Mugabe didn't support land reform at first. He decided to grab back control later. Some of the new farmers were cronies, the vast majority was not. Aren't you... Zimbabwe's land reform. Tens of thousands of violent Mugabe-supporters invaded prosperous white farms, wrecked them and reduced the country to ruins. Not...
Uncle Tom
Well-meaning white man eaten by barbarians in Malawi. Africans can eat all a white man’s money and then eat him too, warns ‘The Lower River’ by Paul Theroux. The book is also seen by some as a critique of development aid. Uncle Tom says no. The hero of this book is a nice white man called Hock. He genuinely wants to help us black folks and have sex with black ladies. This, Uncle Tom can’t blame him for because, forgive me, but the book shows how Hocks’ own old lady doesn’t know how to treat a man.... Well-meaning white man eaten by barbarians in Malawi. Africans can eat all a white man’s money and then eat him too, warns ‘The Lower River’ by Paul...